A Letter to My Younger BIPOC Immigrant Self

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A Letter to My Younger BIPOC Immigrant Self

My love,

It’s okay to not look like everyone else — the color of your caramel skin is beautiful. One day you’ll learn that people pay tons of money to either darken their skin or lighten their skin. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay to be as skinny as you are. One day you’ll learn that your weight doesn’t define you. You’ll gain weight and wish you were skinnier and lose weight and wish you weighed more. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay for you to share a twin-size bed with your sister. One day you’ll learn that these experiences will strengthen your bond with her and deepen your gratitude for a more abundant future. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay for your parents to work two jobs — don’t be embarrassed. One day you’ll learn that hard work pays off and that your parents are committed to providing the best life possible for you and your siblings. Love your parents, here, now.

It’s okay not to dress like everyone else or have the cool new toys. One day you’ll learn that not having is having appreciation for when you do have it in the future. Dressing differently made you stronger and the cool toys didn’t matter at all. Love your life, here, now.

It’s okay for you to wax your hairy arms and unibrow. One day you’ll learn that being hairy doesn’t make you any less attractive. Waxing will become like brushing your teeth if you choose to. Either way, it’s not a problem, and you’re not weird for being hairy. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay not to like peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and other American foods. One day you’ll learn that not eating the same foods as all your friends at the cafeteria table doesn’t mean you’re not worthy of being an American. Being American means embracing different backgrounds and preferences. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay not to go to summer camp like all your friends. One day you’ll learn that the vacations and summer camps you didn’t go to because your parents couldn’t afford it will drive you to provide an even better childhood for your own kids. You’ll take your kids all over the world and create the most beautiful memories. Love yourself, here, now.

It’s okay not to know how to speak English until the first grade. One day you’ll learn that you can learn anything at any age. Not knowing English doesn’t make you dumb; it made you stronger as you got older and learned different life skills. Love your struggle, here, now.

It’s okay to marry someone outside of your religion or race. One day you’ll learn that your parents’ values don’t have to be your own values. You can choose to think differently and that doesn’t make you a bad daughter. Love your choices, here, now.

Your life may seem unfair, unjust, hard, and annoying. One day you’ll learn that these experiences are all part of the master plan for your future life. The life where you are married to the most wonderful Irishman, co-parenting your firstborn son, and have the most beautiful biracial toddler who is obsessed with touching your face. You are living in your dream home close to the water and have the life you wish you had as a little girl. It will all work out, I promise. Love yourself, here, now.

With love,
Sy

Tags: Empowerment, Personal Growth, BIPOC

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Written By

Syeda Neary

Syeda is a human design life coach. She helps you build a life you love and enjoy with confidence in alignment with your Human Design. See Full Bio

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