Taylor Swift Kicks off Women's History Month by Slamming Sexism on Netflix

Taylor Swift

Photo Credit: Michael Hurcomb/Shutterstock

Taylor Swift is not happy with how Netflix is kicking off Women's History Month.

Yesterday, on March 1 — the first day of Women's History Month — the "Cardigan" singer slammed the streaming platform on Twitter for allowing its new show Ginny & Georgia to include a dig at her.

Alongside a screenshot of a line from the show where a character says, “You go through men faster than Taylor Swift,” Swift tweeted: “Hey Ginny & Georgia, 2010 called and it wants its lazy, deeply sexist joke back. How about we stop degrading hard-working women by defining this horse sh*t as FuNnY.”

She then went on to tag Netflix's official Twitter page and lambasted them for allowing the line to air when they previously worked with her on their 2020 documentary, Miss Americana.

“Also, @netflix after Miss Americana this outfit doesn’t look cute on you,” wrote the 31-year-old with a broken heart emoji. “Happy Women’s History Month I guess.”

The tweet had racked up nearly 320,000 likes by noon on Monday. While Netflix did not publicly respond to the call-out, many of Swift's fans had plenty to say about her remarks.

"Proud of you for standing up against this crap. Women (especially you) deserve so much better! We should never be defined by who we’ve dated but by what we do and how we treat others," wrote one fan.

3 Steps Backward for Every Step Forward

"The fact that platforms like [Netflix]  continue to use Taylor swift as a punchline for misogynistic and sexist comments, which might I add, would never be made about a male, is the reason we continue to take 3 steps backward for every step forward in feminism. RESPECT TAYLOR SWIFT," wrote another.

Previously, Swift has spoken out about sexism quite a bit. In October 2019, she shared in an interview with Zane Lowe for Apple Music’s Beats 1 that she'd often seen people "reducing me to, kind of making slideshows of my dating life and putting people in there that I'd sat next to at a party once and deciding that my songwriting was like a trick rather than a skill and a craft."

"It's a way to take a woman who's doing her job and succeeding at doing her job and making things. And in a way, it's figuring out how to completely minimize that skill by taking something that everyone in their darkest, darkest moments loves to do, which is just to slut shame," she said at the time.

This post is part of a month-long March CircleAround series, tied to Women's History Month — the first since the global pandemic that has disproportionately impacted women around the world — in which we asked writers to explore the topic of women's history in America, from the past to very much the present. To see all the posts in the series — including relevant news stories — visit hereAnd if you'd like to contribute to the series, send us your thoughts to info@circlearound.com or post on our "2021 Inspiration Wall."


CircleAround is operated by a wholly owned subsidiary of Girl Scouts of the USA. The site serves adult women nationwide by providing content that is uplifting, thought-provoking, and useful. We make revenue distributions back to GSUSA so they can further their mission of building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

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